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  1. #1
    Member ijjjji's Avatar
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    This post has been ranked 10.00 out of 10 with 1 votes.

    Minimalism - my take on it

    The more milk you have, the more cream you can make.
    -The milk represents random accumulations. The cream represent what you are left with after you pick the very best or most useful things, and throw away the rest.
    -Since I discovered Internet, this was always my philosophy. You gather massive amounts of data, so that the data-quality of the things you select to keep, is as good as possible.
    -There are 2 pitfalls. More data = higher risk of bad data ending up in final selection group. Data gathering creates the common 'collector' addiction.
    Discarding is much harder than selecting a favorite.
    -This especially true for things like clothing. Each garment has experiences/memories tied to it. Individually, they may all possess unique qualities that suggest keeping them.
    -Selecting say the top 5 shirts is easy, if you try all the shirts on in quick succession. Then the trick then becomes to get rid of the rest without taking a second look at them.
    Knowing what you have, makes it easier to avoid duplicates or inferior replacements.
    -Having only the selected few, connects you to that level of quality, and makes it much easier to remember what you have. Thus easy to dismiss new items that dont measure up.
    -On the flip side, knowing what you have, also makes it easier to know exactly what you are looking for.

    Specific things about data, knowledge, systems and practices.
    -The human desire to expand on existing knowledge (like writing a book), is often a path to excess lower quality knowledge.
    -Knowing 2 things usually means knowing them each half as well, compared to only knowing one of them.
    -The act of studying leads to a 'collector addiction', increasing the drive to study further, as opposed to putting what was learned into action.
    -Knowing multiple good ways to handle a sudden situation, sometimes leads to a 'stalemate' type of paralysis.
    -Human action starts in the brain as pictures. Data and 'dry' knowledge has a tendency to reduce the ability to think in pictures, thus reducing the ability to act.

    Based on the above, ideal knowledge is:
    -know only one thing for each 'scenario'
    -know that thing in the form of a picture
    -a picture that is of the nature that lends itself easily to enactment


    Pictures are nice, since they can depict many different details at once... meaning that we can 'cheat' a little, and keep a few pieces of 'knowledge' even if we are going for a single picture... but add too much, and you are back where you started, with a messy jumble of too many things.

    PS: What you just read, is the product of massive research on the subject, followed by 'extracting the cream'. Most of my posts these days aspire to be like that.
    (Could I have boiled it down even further - probably!)
    Loves: Shy Girl-coding into Starry-eyed Extroversion, spamming Open-loops and Mini-cold-reads and lots of light kino.
    Hates: Putting pressure on others. Things that feel 'brainy'.

  2. #2
    Member ijjjji's Avatar
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    From another thread, in regard to 'expanding on knowledge':
    Quote Originally Posted by Groundhog View Post
    When I read this thread, I think of economics.

    Undergrad economics is pretty useful, and its
    theories are just as much art as they are math.
    I would go so far as to say that some basic
    theories are just common sense translated to
    a blackboard.

    Grad level is almost all calculus and other math and has limited utility
    outside the classroom.

    We need to apply common sense to seduction.
    Once we get too wrapped up in theory, real world
    application goes out the window.

    Also, we should consider what the wise philosopher Occam
    once said, that the most likely explanation for any phenomenon
    is usually the simplest. A successful seduction might have
    little to do with anything complicated you do. It may be just
    that she is horny as fuck and you have the nearest cock.
    Go with the flow and leave the calculus behind.

    GROUNDHOG
    Loves: Shy Girl-coding into Starry-eyed Extroversion, spamming Open-loops and Mini-cold-reads and lots of light kino.
    Hates: Putting pressure on others. Things that feel 'brainy'.

  3. #3
    Member thecostofsuccess's Avatar
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    Awesome line of reasoning
    I'll definately employ that for clothing choices and other stuff that I'm not thinking of yet
    Um, only bit that is possibly refuteable
    Is
    -Human action starts in the brain as pictures. Data and 'dry' knowledge has a tendency to reduce the ability to think in pictures, thus reducing the ability to act.
    Was a bit loose, like it was wanting to jump to the conclusion (the rest doesn't do that which makes it rock solid)
    I think maybe the visualisation is a topic on its own?


    Oh btw, in martial arts, I eventually started doing a thing I call "measure of duty", which is I assign each task with a budget of effort
    So, for example, if a guy has a knife, I budget most of my effort towards creating space (to get out of zone of reach)
    Then next is equalisation (jacket, stick, throwable object)
    Then the next is successful gambits or quick shots (flick to the eyes, feints)
    Then the next is shots to lower leg or opposite side of knife and footing (the hardest places for him to counter, that will also slow him)
    Then, shock tactics, like "this is sparta" type kicks straight to the gut withh the intent of being so utterly dangerous his thinking is not quick enough except to flinch (the leg may get cut, but on the outside away from arteries)

    And for every scenario I do up a quick list, and consider it a duty to measure each precise detail and prioritise the best strategies
    I don't cut all of it away, its just a budget of energy I put into each strategy


    After a while you can't get better at fighting unless you calculate, and minimise all the excess (opinions are less important, less reliable).
    But yeah, might be relevant somehow.

  4. #4
    Member ijjjji's Avatar
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    Thanks mate, yea that bit was a bit over-simplified, and also heavily based on my personal experience - who am I to say everyone is exactly the same, right? (But it is so effective for me, that it has become the center piece of my 'knowledge process'.)

    Your 'measure of duty' is very interesting! I think I have a somewhat similar in critical situations, where time 'slows down' and points out what your first task is (Other than fights, also when about to fall considerable distance, and once when I was 5 and fell off a pier.)
    Loves: Shy Girl-coding into Starry-eyed Extroversion, spamming Open-loops and Mini-cold-reads and lots of light kino.
    Hates: Putting pressure on others. Things that feel 'brainy'.

  5. #5
    Member thecostofsuccess's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ijjjji View Post
    Thanks mate, yea that bit was a bit over-simplified, and also heavily based on my personal experience - who am I to say everyone is exactly the same, right? (But it is so effective for me, that it has become the center piece of my 'knowledge process'.)

    Your 'measure of duty' is very interesting! I think I have a somewhat similar in critical situations, where time 'slows down' and points out what your first task is (Other than fights, also when about to fall considerable distance, and once when I was 5 and fell off a pier.)
    Well you might be right that people are different regarding actions, for me there are three active states, visual, kinaesthetic, and happy.
    Sometimes I just feel I wanna be there, other times I'm just happy so don't freak out,
    When I'm seeing visuals, it usually means I'm REALLY going all out
    I assosciate them with degrees of tension

    Happy is level one
    Kinaesthetic level two
    Visual level three

    Um, but, I don't mean to suggest the idea isn't correct, I just think there must be some kind of study to back it up.
    Like is it mirror neurons or something? Or I dunno, I just feel there are questions around it, so it could be interesting to look into it and sure it up a bit. Or maybe it is effective cuz it reduces stress the most and is less easy to fake or get wrong?

    I mean, when guys fake happiness or kinaesthic motivators, they get swatted down quick. So maybe visuals are more fullproof? But then comes the question why? And if they are, how does one properly use it? I mean you've explained that before, roles, lots of subtle info that helps calibration, feels actionable, has wiggle room and is non obssessive.

    Maybe to use it, a guy first has to be calm enough, cleared of things, soo maybe minimalism leads the way to being capable of using visual motivators?

  6. #6



    Quote Originally Posted by ijjjji View Post
    Based on the above, ideal knowledge is:
    -know only one thing for each 'scenario'
    -know that thing in the form of a picture
    -a picture that is of the nature that lends itself easily to enactment


    Pictures are nice, since they can depict many different details at once... meaning that we can 'cheat' a little, and keep a few pieces of 'knowledge' even if we are going for a single picture... but add too much, and you are back where you started, with a messy jumble of too many things.
    Especially the first idea corresponds a lot to what I had an argument about with my headmaster at school as a teacher, and I would like to disagree with you here. She said that it was "scientifically proven" (without really referring to actual studies, but whatever) that if students are looking at words which are written in the wrong way they'll learn them wrongly and then later on have difficulties writing them correctly. I, on the other hand, believed that by exposing students to many different forms of writing (based on the texts the class had written) and giving them feedback on what I considered right or wrong and why, they would develop a much deeper understanding of language long-term than if they only knew the one "right" form of how to write a word. After about 2 months, even one kid who was borderline legasthenic was improving his writing greatly following my approach.

    I picture the phenomen similar to a child learning to grasp at objects around him. If he only sees what happens while he tries grasping at an object as "I managed to do it" vs. an "I failed to do it", he'll gather very little data in his attempt, and even after he successfully has grabbed at the object of his desire (like a teddy bear), when he wants to grab another object, he might have to start almost from scratch again with the movement. If however he has gathered all the consequences of what he tried to do the first time even when it didn't help him grab the teddy bear, he'll be much faster figuring out how to grab a fork (or whatever new object he hasn't grabbed before). So by remembering not only the "right" or "best" action in any scenario but also what happens if you use alternative attempts, you're much more likely to successfully improvise on any new situation. When you have gathered enough "general" information on how something behaves, you can improvise heuristically on any new situation you have gathered sufficient data with in the past. It is how I am able to read books in an extremely fast way while still retaining all the important information: I basically guess what will be written next and what the author will want to bring across, and only when I encounter words or sentences that don't fit those expectations I will have to redirect focus on finding out what he really meant. I didn't even know this was exceptional until other people around me told me I'm insane for reading that fast, like a friend who was astounded a few days ago when I told her I had read a book of >200 pages while taking a bath the other day, which took me about 1,5 hours or something. I'm pretty sure this is possible for me because I have not only focused on what is true or right but throughout my life have also wondered about the rest of the feedback I got which makes it easy to align what I'll encounter as new with something I already have a hunch about in some way. It is also why I really enjoy having an argument with someone I disagree with 100%: I'll get valuable viewpoints I can later use to integrate all the knowledge I have on a topic into an even bigger picture of what I thought was true before.

    I do agree with the 2nd and 3rd point though, picturing stuff in your head makes things a lot easier and will allow you to act easier too.

    Jester
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  7. #7
    Member Qlue's Avatar
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    Imho, minimalism happens naturally when you change your focus from quantity to quality.

    Examples:

    - 3 pairs of really expensive high quality jeans, vs 10 pairs of cheap china made jeans
    - One really expensive high quality house on lots of land, vs buying and selling suburban box houses throughout your life
    - One really good computer vs many video game consoles or shitty laptops/tablets
    - Expensive cast iron pan that you can pass down generations vs teflon/cermaic pan that wears out in a few months.
    - Intermittent fasting and eating high quality Wagyu steak vs eating cheap garbage carbs all day

    We stopped becoming minimalists when companies figured out how to produce low quality products in cheaper countries and get you to buy it.

    ps> you can apply the same mindset to women
    The Qlue, simple perspectives on life.

  8. #8
    Dance Floor Seduction Skills360's Avatar
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    I am a minimalist, now looking into tiny houses/containers... I love the lifestyle but one of the many reasons i got dump, and one of the reasons i decided not to move to texas/nc for high paying job

    Ijji watch the documentary https://minimalismfilm.com/


    Sexting, my unique natural game, aggressive dance floor seductions, 15-20 minutes hook ups in clubs. Learn the proper way to maximize your results in a club type environment, check out my blog and youtube clubbing channel:

    www.dancefloorseduction.com










  9. #9
    Dance Floor Seduction Skills360's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qlue View Post
    Imho, minimalism happens naturally when you change your focus from quantity to quality.

    Examples:

    - 3 pairs of really expensive high quality jeans, vs 10 pairs of cheap china made jeans
    - One really expensive high quality house on lots of land, vs buying and selling suburban box houses throughout your life
    - One really good computer vs many video game consoles or shitty laptops/tablets
    - Expensive cast iron pan that you can pass down generations vs teflon/cermaic pan that wears out in a few months.
    - Intermittent fasting and eating high quality Wagyu steak vs eating cheap garbage carbs all day

    We stopped becoming minimalists when companies figured out how to produce low quality products in cheaper countries and get you to buy it.

    ps> you can apply the same mindset to women

    here, for those of you who don't know about minimalism:

    So what is this minimalism thing? It’s quite simple: to be a minimalist you must live with less than 100 things, you can’t own a car or a home or a television, you can’t have a career, you must live in exotic hard-to-pronounce places all over the world, you must start a blog, you can’t have children, and you must be a young white male from a privileged background.
    OK, we’re joking—obviously. But people who dismiss minimalism as some sort of fad usually mention any of the above “restrictions” as to why they could “never be a minimalist.” Minimalism isn’t about any of those things, but it can help you accomplish them. If you desire to live with fewer material possessions, or not own a car or a television, or travel all over the world, then minimalism can lend a hand. But that’s not the point.
    Minimalism is a tool that can assist you in finding freedom. Freedom from fear. Freedom from worry. Freedom from overwhelm. Freedom from guilt. Freedom from depression. Freedom from the trappings of the consumer culture we’ve built our lives around. Real freedom.
    That doesn’t mean there’s anything inherently wrong with owning material possessions. Today’s problem seems to be the meaning we assign to our stuff: we tend to give too much meaning to our things, often forsaking our health, our relationships, our passions, our personal growth, and our desire to contribute beyond ourselves. Want to own a car or a house? Great, have at it! Want to raise a family and have a career? If these things are important to you, then that’s wonderful. Minimalism simply allows you to make these decisions more consciously, more deliberately.
    There are plenty of successful minimalists who lead appreciably different lives. Our friend Leo Babauta has a wife and six children. Joshua Becker has a career he enjoys, a family he loves, and a house and a car in suburbia. Conversely, Colin Wright owns 51 things and travels all over the world, and Tammy Strobel and her husband live in a “tiny house” and are completely car-free. Even though each of these people are different, they all share two things in common: they are minimalists, and minimalism has allowed them to pursue purpose-driven lives.
    But how can these people be so different and yet still be minimalists? That brings us back to our original question: What is minimalism? If we had to sum it up in a single sentence, we would say, Minimalism is a tool to rid yourself of life’s excess in favor of focusing on what’s important—so you can find happiness, fulfillment, and freedom.
    Minimalism has helped us…

    • Eliminate our discontent
    • Reclaim our time
    • Live in the moment
    • Pursue our passions
    • Discover our missions
    • Experience real freedom
    • Create more, consume less
    • Focus on our health
    • Grow as individuals
    • Contribute beyond ourselves
    • Rid ourselves of excess stuff
    • Discover purpose in our lives

    By incorporating minimalism into our lives, we’ve finally been able to find lasting happiness—and that’s what we’re all looking for, isn’t it? We all want to be happy. Minimalists search for happiness not through things, but through life itself; thus, it’s up to you to determine what is necessary and what is superfluous in your life.
    Through our essays we intend to present to you ideas of how to achieve a minimalist lifestyle without adhering to a strict code or an arbitrary set of rules. A word of warning, though: it isn’t easy to take the first steps, but your journey towards minimalism gets much easier—and more rewarding—the further you go. The first steps often take radical changes in your mindset, actions, and habits. Fret not, though—we want to help: we’ve documented our experiences so you can learn from our failures and successes, applying what we’ve learned to your own situation, assisting you in leading a more meaningful life.
    http://www.theminimalists.com/minimalism/
    Sexting, my unique natural game, aggressive dance floor seductions, 15-20 minutes hook ups in clubs. Learn the proper way to maximize your results in a club type environment, check out my blog and youtube clubbing channel:

    www.dancefloorseduction.com










  10. #10
    Member Stargazer's Avatar
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    To me, the point of minimalism is to use limited resources (like mental capacity or money) in a wise way.

    When making decisions on stuff I like to not be picky at all when covering basic needs (less decision fatigue), and then once the basics are dealt with I can do more careful research for possible upgrades without feeling stressed about it.

    Edit: It is only time for perfectionism after you already got the ball rolling.

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